The Wildness of Christ. The Wildness of His People.

“Do not be like the horse or the mule, which have no understanding but must be controlled by bit and bridle or they will not come to you.”

The Lord wants us to come to Him on our own will. He wants us to be free. He doesn’t want to force us to come to Him, nor do I think He will (there may be some exceptions). He wants a people who are free and don’t have to be controlled by “bit or bridle;” he wants an untamed, wild, moving people.

We know from Scripture that the Spirit is like the wind, and the people of God are like the wind. What does the wind do, what does it look like as it’s blowing leaves around? It is uncontrollable, unseen. And man cannot stop it or restrict it from doing what it wants. It is controlled by an unseen force. This is what the people of God are called to be like (John 3:8).

You may have heard it said that the Lord loves a seeker. It seems that those who follow God; those who are willing to make mistakes, fall down, get  “boo-boos,” are the ones that make the most progress in the Lord (if you can really call it “progress,” that is). Those fortunate few that are free from bit and bridle and are not forced to go anywhere. Instead, they tend to move about freely, hopping fences, crossing boundaries, etc.

I’m often taken to a certain view when I think of the wildness of the Lord. I often think of a bright white stallion that hasn’t been broken. This stallion has never been tamed, never been rode, and has never seen the inside of a fence. The man, who thinks he’s the owner of this stallion, attempts to put a bridle on Him, but He only refuses. The “owner” thinks he can cage Him, keep Him in his pasture, but He breaks free. The “owner” thinks he can saddle up on Him and ride Him to wherever the “owner” wants to go. But He kicks and kicks till he falls off. This is how I view Jesus. A lot can be learned from this analogy.

If you take a close look at the gospels and some of the things Jesus said to the Pharisees, and the things He did right in front of their religious eyes, I’m sure you will quickly see, and agree, with what I am saying. Jesus, even on earth in His human, flesh and bone body, couldn’t be tamed. He couldn’t be controlled. He couldn’t be kept within man’s boundaries of what they thought their Messiah was supposed to be. He was, in short, wild.

We see from John 15:4, “Remain in Me, and I will remain in you.” So we know that Jesus Christ lives inside of us by the Holy Spirit. We Christians have the Creator of the Universe living inside of us! So essentially, everything that Jesus has, we have. So if Jesus was, and is, wild, than so are we. We are not meant to be a tamed, caged, “saddled up,” owned, or a bit or bridled people. Sadly, most of us are. Whether it be religion, politics, or the general systems of this world and country. There are many, many things that can bridle us and keep us from being the wild, untamed people we are meant to be.

May the Lord continually break our bits and our bridles that we put on ourselves, and that others attempt to put on us. May the Lord make us free and truly reveal His untamed-ness on the earth today. Amen.

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12 thoughts on “The Wildness of Christ. The Wildness of His People.

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  1. The reason this is a ‘great reminder’ bro’ is because so many of us live too much of our lives “in our minds”.. in those illusionary worlds we create in our minds.. in vain imaginations rather than having the mind Christ. We aren’t even aware most of the time that we’re “boxing Him inside of one of our mindsets”.. You’re so right.. He’s like the Wind.. wild and free… Man, I want to know Him that way.. oh to be found in Jesus! Thanks again for sharing your thoughts. Keep pressing into HIM !

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  2. Michael, In no way was Jesus like a “wild stallion”. He was God’s obedient serving Son. See John 5:19, and 30; John 6:38, 8:28-29; 12:49-50; 14:10-11. And God’s children are not called to be like “wild, untamed people”, but rather like faithful servants who are engaged in their “master’s” work until he returns. Your perspective on Jesus in this matter is somewhat distorted.

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    1. I would like you to expound on that a little more, Bob. I think you may have missed the point.
      The main point is that people, or in the metaphorical sense in this post, the “owner” try to box Jesus Christ in to a method, set of rules, religious program, etc. The Pharisees tried it and He refused. We try it today, and He refuses. For example, every “revival” begins with a people that are on fire for Christ. People get set free, people fall in love with their saviour. Then, a group of people come in and try to build an evangelical box around in an attempt to keep it contained.
      That was the point. (The revival illustration is only a small example.) I believe you severly missed my point.
      Thanks for your comment, Bob.

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      1. Michael,
        I understand that Jesus doesn’t want to be “boxed in” by our programs and evangelistic revivals or led through our denominational traditions and doctrines by our “bridles”.

        But that point doesn’t support this opening statement of teaching that you make: “The Lord wants us to come to Him on our own will. He wants us to be free. He doesn’t want to force us to come to Him, nor do I think He will (there may be some exceptions). He wants a people who are free and don’t have to be controlled by “bit or bridle;” he wants an untamed, wild, moving people.” You’re right that God doesn’t want to “force” us to come to Him, or to have to drag us to Him at the end of a “bridle”, but He does want us to “come” when He calls and to “obey” when he commands. I think that he wants us to be “free” like a well trained dog who comes when called, walks at his master’s heel when told to “heel”.

        I don’t think that Jesus ever felt that he was at the end of a “bridle” in his relationship with his Father, but he wanted his disciples to be bond or connected to him and the Father like a branch is connected to its vine. You know the point of the analogy.

        We can’t put Jesus or the Spirit into a “revival” box or manage true evangelical revivals from a printed program with a loud concert of “praise” music, some personal testimonies, a biblical sermon, and a prayer-led invitation. I think that we are agreement on that point.

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        1. Okay, yes. We are in agreement with the “trained dog” analogy. Perhaps I should have emphasized a little more on the importance of obediance. I totally agree with that.
          There are times when God will ask something of us which will mean the laying down of our own agendas and priorities.
          Thanks again, Bob! I love our discussions. 🙂

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  3. Michael I tend to agree with about us being confined to a set of rules…So many times it seems we get into a ‘rut’ going to church,singing, taking the offering, preaching , invitation the home…..no room for God to take control. I know the Bible says everything should be done decently and in order, but my thots are if God is controlling the service, it will be i’in order’We can be obedient to God and still be wild!!!

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  4. This is a great picture of Jesus, who will refuse whatever takes away from the pure, perfect, unblemished, divine life of the Father. The divine pursuit of a holy people – a people who have set themselves apart from this world in order to take part of the new creation and new life – is a major theme of the entire Scriptures.

    Jesus was also the spotless Lamb, led to the slaughter and sacrificed on the cross. But we must remember that Christ allowed this to happen by His own submission to His Father’s will, and it was by this sacrifice that all worldly powers were defeated.

    So yes, He was a humble servant to the Father, but also wildly opposed whatever stood in contrast to the Father’s heart.

    At least that’s my $0.02.

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      1. Hey Michael.. after noticing you posted a clarification, I came first here, to read the comments. Personally, when I first read your post I wasn’t reading it to be critical of your choice of words, I was reading it (like I try to do with all things these days) to hear what Jesus is saying through you. My interpretation was very similar to what you said your point was…hence my first comment. So be encouraged. The world is full of people who may not “hear”.. who come from a place determined by their own understanding and their own life experiences.. their comments may or may not be of the Lord… we need to be hearing Him.. continuously. So keep those posts coming!

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